Umkhonto we Sizwe! (Spear of the Nation)
Independent Afrikan centered parenting and education

Raising an Afrikan centered child….

Raising an Afrikan child in a Western dominated worldview has never
been an easy task. Throughout our Maafa, our response to the challenges around nurturing, protecting, educating and raising our children, from an Afrikan perspective has been impotent at best. Our greatest minds and most noted scholars have grappled with a single question for the last 4 Centuries… and Malcolm stated it best…

“Not because a Cat crawls into an oven and has kittens, doesn’t make those kittens biscuits”

Who are we? For the majority of us, answering that question with ONE VOICE is one of our biggest challenges. How do we make sure our kittens are not turned into biscuits? What does our diet say about who we are? Our clothes? Our choices? From my experience having raised an 18 year old Afrikan centered Son within a village context, unless clearly defined, a window of opportunity is created for a crisis in identity. Who you “believe” you are starts in the womb. Everything that child’s mother eats drinks, thinks, feels.. is transmitted directly to her child.

He then is further deeply cultivated in his second womb, the home. What are the images on the walls, on the refrigerator and all around him? What books and magazines are on the bookshelf, what kind of clothes his family wears, the grocery items on the shelves? What is he taught of his family’s origin and the deeper connection to our global community? Of our ancestral legacy and his responsibility to that legacy? We have to get back to basics. Identity 101.

There are Global systems in place, awaiting your answer to that question. That answer will determine if they commit to contribute to the redemption of Afrikan people.

What will your children say you taught them about who “YOU” are and therefore who they must be?
Centered

This article was contributed by:
Sista Maat located in Queens, N.Y., United States

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One Response to “Raising an Afrikan centered child….”

  1. I agree we must take out the time to improve the environment of our children. There is a song that I love called “If I Could” where the singer is talking to her child explaining what she would do if she could. Although the song is touching and true we have to do better as Mother’s collectily making certain that the world we are raising our children in will benefit them not cause them unjustified harm. I sing to my child what I will do as well as what I expect him to do. What are you singing to your child?


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